Tuft Love

In case it’s your first time to casa de Bean In Love, here’s the nutshell about what this post is all about.  We had a rectangular coffee table, bought a sectional a few years later, rectangular coffee table didn’t jive well with new sectional, sought out new, round coffee table, found octagonal one at Goodwill for $12 in hopes to turn it into an ottoman for our footsies.  Got it?  Good.  :)

Here ‘tis:
cottomancoll

Here’s how we did it and how you can make your very own.

Let’s start with…

THE FRAME
The coffee table came home with us from thrifting pretty beat up but I did the usual light sanding (because it was so worn I barely had to sand this piece), a couple of thin and even coats of white spray primer (Rustoleum from Walmart), and a few thin and even coats of white spray paint (Rustoleum American Accents).cottomanframecoll


THE CUSHION BASE/WOOD
The original plan was to cut a piece of wood that was the exact same size as the glass top, thereby fitting right into it’s spot.  Then we were just going to upholster the entire top of the coffee table; wrapping and stapling the fabric over and under the existing ledge.  But, to keep the ottoman from looking too much like a large mushroom, we (Anthony) came up with a better idea to upholster a piece of wood slightly larger than the existing glass but smaller than the top of the table. 

The red line in the picture below represents the size the wood was cut to and the red dots represent the holes Anthony drilled and how/where the screws that held the cushion on would go. 
cottoman 032 

We used 1/2 thick plywood from Home Depot and (bonus!) actually bought a large piece that gave us two wood bases instead of one.  The plan is to make a second cushion we can switch out with the first one when the need for change strikes.  But that’s on the back burner with baby #3 coming in a month.  We might add a 2x4 underneath and across the base and for added support but the 1/2 plywood was strong enough to withstand Anthony standing on the ottoman and will definitely hold up to our resting feet and the climbing tots.

Home Depot cut the plywood into two large squares for us so all Anthony had to do was cut off the corners to get the octagon shape we needed.  He used some fancy measuring and a circular saw and that’s all I know about that.  If you have any questions about cutting wood, inbox me or comment and I’ll refer them to the pro.  :) cottomanwoodcoll


THE FOAM
You might remember it took me forever to find foam.  Working on a budget, we didn’t want to spend the $44 it would have cost to buy a three-inch thick slab of foam from the fabric store (and that was during a 50% off sale!) so I scoured the interweb and after a few frustrating surfs, found this post over at The Shabby Creek Cottage.  Gina upholstered a coffee table using an egg crate mattress and it looked pretty darn good.  My friend Jenn also used the same thing to upholster a headboard and it too looked and still looks awesome.  So, my decision was made.  I made a trip to Walmart and grabbed two full-size foam mattresses (one-inch thick).  (Side note:  I couldn’t find “egg crate” mattresses so settled on the “5-zone” kind hoping it’d all still pan out the same, which it did.)  The plan was to layer the mattresses to give us the height and cushion we were looking for.

So first I traced the wood base onto the smooth side of the mattress with a sharpie.
 cottoman 007 cottoman 009cottoman 008 
I wasn’t sure if I was going to layer three or four together so I cut four just in case – two on each mattress.  I ended up using three layers.

For extra staying power, I glued two of the layers of foam “zone” or rippled sides together with some spray adhesive we had on hand.  (Side note:  Make sure to do this outside!!  It smells and surely you don’t want glue all over your stuff!)
cottoman 015

Next I stacked the layers onto the wood base like so:
cottoman 017
It was single layer, smooth side down first (or against the wood) on top of which were the two glued-together layers.
I didn’t glue the bottom layer to the wood because it stayed put well on its own and would even more so once the tufting was done and the fabric was over it.

THE BUTTONS AND TUFTING
We wanted our ottoman to be tufted and we wanted some deep tufting.  So I picked up a craft cover button kit from JoAnn fabrics (brand:  Dritz, size: 45 or 1 1/8 inch, direct link here).

Verses using a different, coordinating or contrasting fabric for the buttons, we used the same fabric we were using to upholster the cushion. cottoman 004

I won’t go into the details of how to assemble the buttons because the instructions on the button kit are awesome but I will say that, per the recommendation of a few experienced tufters in blogland, we added a dab of Liquid Nails to each button before securing the backs to keep them from popping off.  We let them sit and dry for several hours before we used them.
 cottomanbuttoncoll

Behold, the buttons:
  cottoman 012 

Next up, the tufting.  This is where I ran into a little dilemma.  I wasn’t sure how to pattern the tufting.  If you’re an Instagram or Facebook friend, you might’ve have seen my plea for help.  Which one?  The top pattern or the bottom?
cottoman100
Well, the majority went for the bottom pattern along with Anthony but my initial thought was towards the top pattern.  After deciding, redeciding, checking what y’all had to say, and redeciding again, we both decided we liked the top pattern best.  (A BIG THANK you to my good friend Lauren who supplied me with picture texts of their round, tufted ottoman during this whole process so I could see how it was tufted/constructed, not to mention for dealing with my panicked text pleas for advice.)  :)

So, once the pattern was decided upon, I carefully measured out where each button was to be placed, starting with the center and marking the spots with a sharpie.
 cottoman 014

Then Anthony drilled the holes where I marked.
 cottoman 016

(Side note:  We tufted before we upholstered/stapled the fabric around the edges so that we could get our buttons fairly deep into the cushion.  If you’re going for shallow tufting, I’d upholster first.)  Before we started installing buttons, we made sure the fabric was centered over the ottoman (and if you’re using batting, make sure you grab it and lay it under your fabric.  We were planning on using some and completely forgot!  It shouldn’t be a big deal though.)  Then we started with the center button and moved out to the circle, doing one button and then the one on the opposite side of it until all the buttons were installed.
  cottoman 019

Also, to make sure the fabric was evenly laid out around the ottoman and folds were where they should be, we pinned fabric together around the center button over the place where each outer button would be.  Make sense?  I hope so.cottoman 024
It’s probably not necessary to do this if you’re not tufting in a circle but we found it kept us from pulling too much fabric towards one button or another.

But, let’s backtrack a little to the how-to of tufting.  I mentioned above that we wanted deep(er) tufting.  (We used this tutorial on deep tufting at Sarah M. Dorsey Designs.  It was so helpful and we couldn’t have done it without it!!) 
Here’s what you’ll need to get in deep:
A long upholstery needle
Thick thread or twine (we used the same twine I wrapped these soap dispensers with)
Your covered buttons
A staple gun
Two people
 
With the entire cushion set on two of our dining room chairs acting as saw horses, Anthony laid underneath the cushion, working from the bottom as I worked from the top.

So…

First, thread the needle and push it up through the pre-drilled hole from underneath the cushion.  cottoman 020

Next, pull one end of the string up and out of the hole and remove the needle.  Make sure not to pull out the other end!
cottoman 021

Then, thread on your button followed by the needle and insert the needle back down through the pre-drilled hole to person numero dos below.  I found that using the end of the screwdriver to push the needle down through the fabric and foam saved my fingers from distress.  You might too.  :)
cottoman 022

Once person #2 has the needle and thread pulled all the way through, push on the button until it sits as deep as you’d like…
cottoman 023
…until person #2 can tie a knot in the string and staple it to the wood to hold it in place like so: cottoman 030

(For even deeper tufting, you can also carve out a little more room into the foam below each button, like Sarah did.  We skipped that step.)

 
UPHOLSTERING
Like I noted above, we tufted before upholstering to get our buttons in deep.  Because of this, our foam and fabric were both now secured to the cushion so all that was left to do was staple the fabric to the underside of the wood base.

Before stapling though, I cut off the upper corner of the top layer of foam to make getting a rounded top edge of the cushion a little easier.
 cottoman 026

Then we set the entire cushion on its side and began working our way around.  Starting in the middle of one straight edge, we pulled the fabric tight and popped in a staple, then stapling towards the corners on the underside of the wood.  We placed the staples about 2-3 inches in from the edge.  The process wasn’t any different than upholstering a chair seat, like this desk chair we did a couple of months back.    cottoman 027

Staple the middle of one side, staple to each corner, staple at corner, turn to next side, repeat process x 8 until all sides were nice and tight.cottoman 028

When we were done, there was a lot of excess fabric hanging around, not to mention the excess string hanging from the tufting knots.
cottoman 029 

But, a little trim later and we had a nice, clean undercarriage and enough extra fabric to make a couple of throw pillows later.
cottoman 031

Before we attached the cushion to the table base the next morning (because by this time it was close to midnight), I took the entire cushion outside and gave it a nice spray-down with Scotch Gard for protection from stains and spills, heaven forbid.
 cottoman 035
This is another must-do-outside because this stuff will burn your nose hairs right off. 


And finally, our new cottoman, coined by my bestie Megan Rose. cottoman 036 cottoman 037 
Originally I loved the shelf underneath this particular coffee table and envisioned baskets upon it hiding toys but now I think it makes the whole ottoman look a little too “country” for my taste.  What do you think?  It comes off with a twist of a few screws and I think we’re leaning towards taking it off for a more open feel.  Stay tuned.

cottoman 039 cottoman 040 cottoman 043
I know what you’re thinking, “Something’s off in the picture above…”.  Yep, we split up the sectional hence the lack of an arm that loveseat’s not sporting.  We rearranged our living room so the girls could have a larger space of their own in the corner (no more toys stashed everywhere; they’re all in that corner now) and we’re still not sure what we think of it.  Time will tell…

  cottoman 044

The cottoman is definitely the bright spot in the room and makes all of the undone decorating in the room even more obvious and, well, majorly wanting.  My first thought upon seeing it all set up in the room was how bad it clashed with our $35 rug.  I was tempted to run out right then and there to grab another.  Patience be with me though.  Change be acomin’!

I wrote a little post about our plans for this room several months back but just for another quick overview, here they are in a nutshell:

livingroomplans 
(photo of rug idea from here, chair fabric ideas from here)

You know I’ll keep you posted on progress.  :)

And last but never least, a budget breakdown:
Coffee table:  $12 (Goodwill)
Spray primer and paint:  $8 (Walmart)
Plywood:  $9 (Home Depot) We only used half; the remaining half is cut and stored to make a second cushion.
Foam:  $21 (mattress foam from Walmart)
Fabric: $29 (Dena Nadia Green Tea from eBay but
originally found at JoAnn Fabrics) I still have 20 inches to use for a couple of throw pillows or whatever else I can come up with.
Button kit:  $5 (with a 50% off coupon at JoAnn Fabrics)
Twine, staple gun, staples, and screws:  already had
Liquid Nails:  already had
Scotch Gard:  already had (Walmart)
GRAND TOTAL:  $84
Not the cheapest project to date but definitely worth every penny (and because we spent it all over a long period of time, it didn’t seem so hard on our bank account).  Just ask our feet.  :)

Anyway, with the budget breakdown I’ve hit 2212 words so I think wrapping up is probably a good idea.  Like always, if you have any questions or if I need to explain anything better, just holler!  If you find this tutorial useful and create your own coffee-table-turned-ottoman or tufted whatever, we’d love to know and see what you’ve created!  Use the hashtag #heybeanlook on Instagram or email us (beaninlove@gmail.com) or find us on our Facebook page or leave comment.  I’ll get back to you asap!

That’s it…until we reupholster the extra cushion that is.  Let’s get this baby out first though and see what 3 under 2 gives us time-wise.  :)

Have a great Monday everybody!

19 comments:

  1. Whew- I am exhausted just about how hard yall worked to finish that cottomon. But it turned out AWESOME! So pretty. :)

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  2. Sheena, you are amazing!

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  3. Looks great!! I love the fabric. My vote is to remove the bottom "tray" on the ottoman. You did a great job!

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    1. Thanks Elizabeth! I'm one step closer to grabbing the screwdriver and getting that thing off. :)

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  4. This is awesome! I'm doing the same thing right now to an octagon coffee table. I'm having trouble figuring out where the buttons go! How did you measure and decide where the buttons go with all the angles? Did you draw lines on the board at certain places? Thanks!

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    1. No way!!! So awesome Katy! Please, please, please send me pictures when you're finished! If I get a chance I'll update the post with how I measured for the buttons but in the meantime I simply found the center of each side of the octagon and drew a line from the middle of one side to the middle of the opposite side. Where the lines crossed in the middle was the center and then for the surrounding circle of buttons I measured in 6.5 inches from the edge (toward the center and along the drawn line) and placed a button there. You could also measure from point to point and get the same effect. Does that make sense? If it helps, our coffee table measured 37 inches across from straight edge to straight edge so placing buttons 6.5 inches in seemed not too close to the center but not too close to the edge either. :)
      Hope that helps!

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  5. Holy cow that looks AMAZING! Great job! I love the idea of taking something and making something totally different out of it, plus who doesn't use their coffee table as an ottoman anyways.. I think taking the bottom part off would look great or maybe dress it up with a pop of color pulled from the fabric?

    Quick question: did you leave the bottom unfinished plywood? (You may have mentioned what you did but I have tiny hand swiping at me and might have skimmed that part!)

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    1. Thank you!!! Thanks for you two cents on the bottom shelf! I didn't think of painting it a coordinating color! I might mull over that one but I think in the end it's the wicker texture that gets me. We'll see...

      Do you mean the underneath portion of the plywood that's visible under the table; the base of the cushion? I guess to answer your question it'd be easiest to say that we didn't do anything special to the plywood. I thought about painting it underneath but nobody sees it but crawling babies so in the end it'd be a waste of paint.

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  6. I love it Sheena! So fun and fresh! I'm undecided for the shelf underneath.... It didn't strike me as country, and I do love me some baskets for storage, so maybe I'm leaning that way. I bet you're glad this project is done! :)

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  7. It looks amazing! I think if I were going to try and do this, I would need to borrow your husband. Do you loan him out? ;)

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    1. Haha! Anytime Jenn...in all his free time. ;)

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  8. I think the wicker looks okay, but not great. I'm kind of a wicker hater though. I would probably try to replace the wicker shelf with a solid wood shelf since a shelf down there is super useful, although that might be easier said than done. It's a tough question though, since I can't decide if my hatred of wicker or love of shelf is stronger!

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    1. That's a good idea! It probably wouldn't be that hard to replace...we'd just have to trace the old shelf on a new and attach the existing hardware to get it on. Hmm...

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  9. This is great! I'm trying to figure out how I can modify this to fit our [existing] coffee table!

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  10. Thanks Kelly! I hope it works for you! Hopefully all you'll have to do is cut a piece of wood to the shape of your coffee table and then attach it from the bottom. I'd love to see pictures when you're done!

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  11. how did you attach it to the table?

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    1. We just attached it using four long screws that went through holes we pre-drilled into the coffee table. There's a picture in the post showing where we drilled the holes in the base. :) The screws were installed from underneath. Make sense?

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Whatcha think? I'm all ears...errr, eyes! I love your comments and I love responding. If your name is linked to your email, I'll hit you up there. If not, check back! I'd love to see you again anyway!

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